The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) requires that employees receive overtime calculated at one-and-a-half times the “regular rate” of pay for hours over 40 in a workweek unless the employees are “exempt” from overtime.  A new rule, slated to go into effect on January 15, 2020, makes it easier to determine the regular rate

Connecticut employers need to be aware of two significant changes in the law surrounding internships.

The first is a new state statute including unpaid interns in the protections afforded to employees with respect to discrimination and harassment. Employers should update their handbooks and training materials to ensure that interns receive the same protections as employees

A recent speech by Labor Secretary Thomas Perez at the IAFF conference provided some details about the changes to the managerial exemption to the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).  Significantly, Secretary Perez reiterated that the current salary threshold of $455 is inadequate and that the primary duties test creates an employer friendly “loophole” that is used to prevent many low income employees from earning overtime. 

The last changes to the managerial exemption occurred in 2004 when the salary threshold was raised from $250 to $455.  This was the second increase in the 40 years the exemption has existed.  The remarks by Secretary Perez mirror those made by President Obama back on March 13th that the current $455 threshold is inadequate.  


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Employers in the construction industry should not be surprised if the Department of Labor comes knocking at their door in the near future.  Recently, the Hartford office of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division announced an enforcement initiative to identify and eliminate wage and hour violations through increased compliance with the federal